What the state is afraid of! Adam Braseel Case.

In 2001 the State of Tennessee passed the Intractable Pain Act. Some saw this as an opportunity to cash in by opening pain clinics, who by law, could now prescribe opioids unfettered, to any customer who simply asked for them. This caused a widespread epidemic of OxyContin.

Though the maker of OxyContin. Perdue, claimed the drug was non addictive and had no street value, it was soon learned this could not be further from the truth. The re-selling of Oxycontin became so lucrative that pharmacies were raking in huge profits, while dealers found ways to get the drug in large quantities by sending runners to the clinics.

In the case of Malcolm Burrows, direct evidence has been discovered that he had formed a business with a local nurse, funding her clinic to the tune of sixty thousand dollars. That both he and the nurse were under investigation by the TBI at the time of his death. Malcolm had a record for dealing pills, witnesses were found that worked for Malcolm, his house was gang raided by the DEA and when he died, he had high levels of OxyContin in his system.

All of which was swept under the rug while Adam Braseel was convicted of murder. While Adam appealed his conviction — the first, second and third time. At all times, this information was hidden from the defendant. Information the State had, but did not disclose or consider in its prosecution. And thereby hiding the natural suspects linked to Malcolm through his business.

In the States Attorney’s filings, they call Malcolm Burrows: an elderly Shade Tree Mechanic, who went out of his house to help people with their cars.

Witnesses who dealt with Malcolm say that may be true, but Malcolm went out of his house to meet people to make drug deals. That whoever was in the gold colored car seen by Angie white, was most likely waiting for Malcolm to get home to buy pills. That Malcolm was killed by someone he screwed over in some drug deal, or who was afraid he would rat them out.

Adam Braseel had no connection to Malcolm’s drug business. He was convicted by the testimony of Malcolm’s relatives, his sister Becky and her son Kirk. The only motive they could come up with? Robbery of his wallet.

If you don’t understand how frightening this is, lets have an example.

Imagine you were visiting Chicago and a man was murdered that weekend. You were arrested because you had a green car.  At trial, the man’s widow got on the stand and said you were the one she saw come to their house and you are convicted.

Later you find out the man was a mobster and the person who fingered you was the wife of a mobster. Yet the police never told you or the jury this, even though they knew. The woman was allowed to testify as if they were all one nice law-abiding family.

In this case, not only did the state create the mobster, by allowing the Intractable Pain Act to be the law of the land, they then hid the mobster they created from a young man they convicted of his murder.

All while they just sat there and watched.

It is no accident that in the one lonely forum about Adams conviction, there was a posting from 2009 to take note of:

Sheriff Myers would arrest a ham sandwich for being Jewish. If there’s a way to mess up a case, make a poor judgement call or side with the wrong party, “The Blind Eye of Justice” will find a way to look the wrong way.

Seriously. He messed up the simplest case for us which could have been a real victory for him had he handled one step of it even partially competently.

How is this man in office?

 

Side with the wrong party? Mess up the simplest case for us? Look the wrong way?

Absolutely!

They just sat there and watched. Never revealing the true identity of Malcolm Burrows and his illicit dealings to the jury or the defendant. All the time the real killer is on the loose.

Destroying a man’s life and his family to protect a secret. Yeah, they have something to hide.

 

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